Table 1.

Comparison of diversity of anomodont fossils through 13 time bins, spanning from the Middle Permian (bottom) to Late Permian

StageLucas LVFKaroo LVFMyrAnomodont speciesAnomodont-bearing fmsAll fmns
Nor(l)Revueltian22216
Crn(u)Adamanian3.52217
Crn(m)Otischalkian2.52317
Lad(u)-Crn(l)Berdvankian53631
Ans(u)-Lad(l)PerovkanCynognathus C423840
Ole(u)-Ans(l)NonesianCynognathus A, B6.5131359
Ind-Ole(l)LootsbergianLystrosaurus2.59849
Chx(m-u)PlatbergianDicynodon334128
Wuc(u)-Chx(l)SteilkransianCistecephalus1.527616
Wuc(m)HoedemakeranTropidostoma2.516815
Cap(u)-Wuc(l)Gamkan IIPristerognathus27411
Cap(l-m)Gamkan ITapinocephalus4.513311
WorKapteinskraalianEodicynodon25215
  • Standard stratigraphic stages, and two systems of Land Vertebrate Faunachrons (LVF) are given, as well as durations of these intervals, in Myr (millions of years). The Dicynodont-bearing formations (fmns) are those from Fröbisch (2008) that yielded anomodont fossils, whereas ‘All formations’ are all named stratigraphic units that have yielded any kind of fossil tetrapod remains. Stage-name abbreviations: Ans, Anisian; Cap, Capitanian; Chx, Changhsingian; Crn, Carnian; Ind, Induan; Lad, Ladinian; Nor, Norian; Ole, Olenekian; Wor, Wordian; Wuc, Wuchiapingian.